Twitter goes after born-again typosquatter

The Register reports that: “…Twitter has filed a cybersquatting complaint against the owner of the typo domain name twiter.com, seven years after it was first registered.

The website at twiter.com currently bounces visitors to one of a number of dodgy competitions that try to persuade them to sign up to premium SMS text-message services.

Twitter has filed a complaint with the World Intellectual Property Organisation using the Uniform Dispute Resolution Policy, an anti-cybersquatting policy created by ICANN

Twitter will have to prove that the domain was registered in bad faith.

UDRP panelists typically rule that domains cannot be registered in bad faith if they were registered before the trademark even existed. Twitter acquired its trademark in 2007.

However, historical Whois records show that twiter.com may have changed ownership once or more over the last few years, most recently in April this year.

WIPO currently advises its adjudicators that when a domain is transferred to a new registrant, the clock is reset and it can be treated as a new registration.

This twist means Twitter likely has a stronger case than it may first appear, and may be the reason it waited for five years before going after the domain name..” (For Full report: Kevin Murphey, The Register).

Microsoft to pay $290m for patent infringement

The US Supreme Court has denied an appeal by Microsoft against a $290m verdict for infringing a small Canadian company’s patent.

The company, i4i, sued Microsoft in 2007, saying it owned the technology behind a text manipulation tool used in Microsoft’s Word application.

The technology gave Word 2003 and Word 2007 users an improved way of using a document’s contents.

Lower courts had said Microsoft wilfully breached the patent.

They ordered the world’s biggest software maker to pay up, and to stop selling versions of Word containing the infringing technology (Full report: BBC website).

French Broadcasters to Avoid Naming Social Media Sites

Like broadcasters elsewhere, French news anchors sometimes urge viewers or listeners to visit Twitter or Facebook to receive updates or to comment. In a decree issued last week, the regulatory agency that oversees French television and radio said broadcasters should not mention the names of specific Internet companies when doing so, calling this a violation of French rules banning surreptitious advertising (Eric Pfanner, The New York Times).

Apple’s iCloud Making Music Pirates Pay

Apple CEO Steve Jobs “…unveiled a system that might finally get music lovers to pay for the songs they got through less-than-proper means…

…Aside from offering to freely distribute new and old iTunes purchases on all of a user’s devices, the Apple impresario unveiled “iTunes Match,” a $25-a-year service starting this fall that will scan users’ devices and hard drives for music acquired in other ways, store it on distant computer servers and allow them to access it anywhere..” (Billboard – Ryan Nakashima, AP)

US Copyright Office To Amend Termination Regulations

The Copyright Office has amended its regulations governing notices of termination of certain grants of transfers and licenses of copyright under section 203 of the Copyright Act. The amendments are intended to clarify the recordation practices of the Copyright Office regarding the content of certain notices of termination as well as the circumstances under which such notices will be accepted by the Office. In particular, the regulations clarify that where an author agreed, prior to 1978, to a grant of rights in a work that was not created until after 1977, a notice of termination of a grant under section 203 may be recorded if it recites, as the date of execution, the date on which
the work was created (Read more:  U.S Copyright Office).

YouTube Money With Strings Attached

YouTube is trying to convince professional content makers to create stuff for the video site. And it’s offering some of them millions of dollars to make it happen.
But even though Google has plenty of money, it’s not giving it away. That
cash comes with strings (For full report see Peter Kafka, All Things Digital).

Convicted For Illegal File Sharing

The first person in Scotland to be convicted of illegally sharing music files online has been sentenced to three years probation. The BBC reports that Nurse Anne Muir admitted distributing £54,000 worth of copyrighted music files by making them available to others via a peer-to-peer file sharing application (For full report BBC website).

eBay and PayPal sue Google

Google is being sued by internet payment firm PayPal over claims the web giant stole technology allowing smartphones to buy things in shops.

PayPal allege that former executives Osama Bedier and Stephanie Tilenius defected and used trade secrets to help their new company create Google Wallet.
The lawsuit was filed just hours after Mr Bedier, who was hired just five months ago, launched the product in New York, where it will be tested this summer (Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1391421/eBay-PayPal-sue-Google-stealing-mobile-payment-trade-secrets.html?ITO=1490).

UK Government To Review Film Policy

The UK government is to review its film policy through an independent panel of UK film experts including members of the board of the BFI.

According to a statement in the Department for Culture, Media & Sport‘s website: “…The panel will look across the UK film industry, considering film development and production, distribution and exhibition; as well as considering inward investment and film export…”.

 

Apple Protects Application Makers

A little more than a week after iOS developers were  threatened with legal action by a company that holds various patents, Apple’s legal department has struck back.

Apple has sent a letter to patent-holder Lodsys after many iOS developers reported receiving letters containing a threat that they risked patent-infringement lawsuits if they didn’t pay Lodsys to license a patent covering in-app purchasing and other app-related matters.

In it’s letter, Apple says its existing license for patents covering in-app purchases applies to all iOS app makers as well.

The crux of Apple’s letter, from senior vice president and general counsel Bruce Sewell, is right in its opening paragraph, which reads in part: “Apple is undisputedly licensed to these patents and the Apple App Makers are protected by that license. There is no basis for Lodsys’ infringement allegations against Apple’s App Makers. In addition to stating that Apple would share the letter with developers—which it has—the company also says that it “is fully prepared to defend Apple’s license rights.” (for full article see Lex Freedman, Macworld).